top of page

Seminar on Contributing to Theory Progress

Since 2010, I have been teaching a doctoral seminar on theory development, reasoning, argumentation, scientific writing, and publication. Given that these are general topics relevant to all researchers no matter what their research interest and approach, I have for several years wanted to offer the seminar to the general public, but haven't found a way to do it. Thanks to Ibrat Djabbarov and the New Scholars Network, I have been able to offer an online version of this seminar as a public service, free of charge, to anyone who is interested. An introduction to the seminar can be found here and the syllabus here.

The live sessions for the first edition of the seminar were held on Zoom in April-May 2024. The sessions were 90 minutes each and consisted of a 45-60 minute lecture, followed by discussion. The lectures were recorded and are available on YouTube (links below). I also recorded follow-up reflections for each session, elaborating on the key issues and addressing audience questions I did not have time to address in the live session.

The total length of the recordings is about six hours.

---

(1) How do I make a scholarly contribution?

You can access the recorded lecture here and my follow-up reflection on the relevance of the concept of truth here.

(2) How do I reason?

You can access the recorded lecture here. In the follow-up reflection, I explored in more detail the diversity of abductive reasoning and why it is crucial not to confound induction and abduction.

(3) How do I structure my argument?

You can access the recorded lecture here. In the follow-up reflection, I explored in more detail the notion of bias in light of the Toulmin model and the examples discussed in the third session. I propose that some biases are not only unavoidable but perhaps even desirable; others are undesirable, and should be mitigated. Most importantly, making biases explicit and transparent benefits the conversation.

(4) How is my argument evaluated?

You can access the recorded lecture here. In the follow-up reflection, I explored in more detail the "dos and don'ts" of the peer review process from the author's point of view.

(5) In what ways can I seek to be relevant?

You can access the recorded lecture here. My final reflections on the first edition of this seminar are available here.

bottom of page